fbpx

FAQ

Yes, EMS is very safe.  Even though our system uses electrical current to stimulate muscle contraction, this current is not strong enough to reach any internal organs. Our bodies are composed of several layers that the current must pass through. Firstly, the electric current must pass the skin. Then it penetrates a fat layer under the skin. Furtherly, it reaches the muscles and generates muscle contraction. After the skeletal muscles, the current intensity is reduced to a minimal amount.  This minimal amount of current would then have to pass through another thick layer of fat before the internal organs. This fat layer has a significantly high resistance because of its thickness and because of its high specific resistance, thus the electrical intensity is reduced to 0 and does not reach the internal organs.

EMS technology uses a specialized suit to facilitate stimulation of your muscles.  Under this suit you will have an undergarment that we will provide for you.  This undergarment is made from a material that allows the current to pass through to your muscles.  Therefore, the only thing you might want to bring with you is a water bottle.

EMS is a high intensity training system requiring the body to be hydrated and to have energy stores. 2-4 hours before the training you should eat a balanced meal comprised of 70% carbohydrates, 35% protein and 5% fats.  Whole grains and lean meats are recommended.  In the event that a meal is not possible because of lack of time, 1-2 hours before the training you can eat 2 bananas and a tablespoon of peanut butter (in case of peanut allergies oatmeal can be used as replacement). 30-60 minutes before your training you should drink a minimum of 32 oz. of water. It is important to understand that EMS requires you to have energy in the form of glycogen which comes from healthy carbohydrate rich foods.

Yes.  EMS is training system that can be tailored to anyone’s abilities and limitations.  Whether you are a seasoned athlete or a couch potato, we can modify the exercises, resistance and intensity so that you will get a great workout.

There are several contraindications that would prevent you from using EMS.  If you have any of the following, you cannot train:

  • Implanted or external medical device (e.g. cardiac pacemaker, implanted defibrillator, insulin pump).
  • Severe cardiovascular diseases (e.g. severe heart or aortic disease).
  • Neurological disorder.
  • Medication-controlled or medication-uncontrolled seizures or convulsions (e.g. epilepsy).
  • Neuromuscular disorder (e.g. rhabdomyolysis or any disorder that affects the nervous system and the muscles and causes rapid breakdown in muscle structure).
  • Cancerous lesions (e.g. breast cancer). Also, anyone who is a cancer survivor should not train due to lack of studies in this area.
  • Severe nephrological disease.
  • Anyone currently having or having a tendency of internal bleeding.
  • Infected, wounded or any non-healthy, inflamed, irritated or edematous skin area).
  • Pregnancy or suspected pregnancy.

If you are pregnant or suspect that you may be pregnant, it is not recommended that you train using any type of electrical muscle stimulation due to the lack of studies in this area. 

The human body is highly efficient and will never exert more force and engage more muscle than it needs to in order to perform a certain action.  For example, to bench press 45lbs, the brain tells the body to use only the amount of muscle needed to lift 45lbs.  Whole Body EMS uses the same pathways and electrical impulses the nervous system uses to tell the body that the entire muscle needs to be engaged even when we are not lifting anything.  The system uses targeted muscle contractions to simulate resistance and employ deeper muscles, facilitating quicker gains in lean muscle mass.

Training after surgery is fine as long as there is no muscle atrophy and the scar tissue has healed.  Once you are cleared by your doctor for training, we tailor the workouts around any injuries you have, so that we do not place any additional loads on the affected areas.  We still train the muscles, but in a way that does not place additional or undue stress on the joints and muscles affected. 

EMS technology was originally developed for the elderly to help them with muscle mass loss.  As we age, we have less fast-twitch muscles responsible for speed and agility and more slow-twitch muscles.  EMS use in older adults has many benefits, but the biggest is that there have been studies showing the transformation of slow-twitch muscles into fast-twitch muscles. The individuals in these studies regained more muscle mass and were more agile. The beauty of EMS is that exercises can be performed sitting down or in low impact movements, so older adults, and even people with mild injuries, can train safely.